Guides & Tools

This page synthesizes research, management, and monitoring resources that can be used to support the development and management of sustainable shorelines in the Hudson River Valley. Hudson-specific resources have been excerpted for your convenience in the drop down menu below, but the library also includes information from other regions. 

Guides & Tools Library

TitlePartners/AuthorsGeographic ScopeDescriptionKeywords
A Comparative Cost Analysis of Ten Shore Protection Approaches at Three Sites Under Two Sea Level Rise ScenariosHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyCompares 10 shoreline protection methods at three sites along the Hudson. The study calculated the costs for construction, maintenance, and replacement as they are affected by increasing sea level rise and storms. It found that over a 70-year period, cumulative costs for ecologically enhanced shoreline treatments can be comparable to harder approaches.Planning
Bathymetry and Benthic MappingNew York State GIS ClearinghouseHudson River ValleyA grid showing elevation in meters of the floor of the Hudson River Estuary.Research, Planning
Biodiversity in Hudson River Shore Zones: Influence of Shoreline Type and Physical StructureCary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Bard CollegeHudson River ValleyDocuments the biodiversity supported by different kinds of shore zones in the Hudson River Estuary. Physical characteristics and biological communities were assessed for six common shore zone types. It was found that engineered shore zones (especially cribbing and bulkheads) tend to have less desirable biodiversity characteristics than “natural” shore zones (e.g., they have fewer fish and native plants and more invasives). No single shore type provided high values for all of the ecological functions assessed.Research, Planning
Case Study on Designing Living Shorelines for New England CoastsNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationAtlanticA smaller project with 3 sites along the Massachusetts coast, highlighting the importance of well-planned site analysis and collaborative planning in creating more resilient shorelines.Management strategies
Coastal Risk Reduction and ResilienceUS Army Corps of EngineersNationalUSACE provides guidance on nature/nature-based, non-structural, and structural tactics for shoreline protection, ultimately promoting an integrated approach to coastal risk concerns.Management strategies
Delaware Living Shorelines CommitteeDelaware Department of Natural Resources, Delaware Center for the Inland Bays, Delaware Living Shorelines CommitteeAtlanticCommittee for creating living shorelines along Delaware’s coasts as opposed to “hardened” structures such as bulkheads and ripraps. Aimed at private landowners along the coastline.Management strategies
Design and Planning for Flood Resiliency- Guidelines for NYC ParksNew York City ParksNew York CityThese guidelines identify and recommend strategies, best practices, and appropriate materials for creating resilient waterfront parks and open spaces in New York City.Climate impacts, Management strategies
Development of a Protocol to Assess the Relative Habitat Values of Urban Shorelines in New York – New Jersey HarborNew York - New Jersey Harbor & Estuary Program, Hudson River FoundationAtlanticProtocol developed and prepared for the Hudson River Foundation and New York – New Jersey Harbor Estuary Program.Research, Planning
Economic Tradeoffs Between Shoreline Treatments: Phase I—Assessing Approaches: A Report Prepared for the Hudson River National Estuarine Research ReservesHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, VanLuven EnvironmentalHudson River ValleySets forth a framework for an economic assessment of different shoreline approaches by distilling key ecosystem services that should be included in a cost-benefit analysis. The framework generates information that decision-makers can use to compare the long-term costs of different shore treatments. Planning
Effects of Surface Roughness on Ecological Function: Implications for Engineered Structures in the Hudson River Shore ZoneCary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Virginia Tech, Hudson River FoundationHudson River ValleyInvestigates whether and how manipulation of surface roughness on artificial structures alters its ecological function in the shore zone. Tiles with different surface roughness were deployed at four sites on the freshwater tidal Hudson, and the accumulation of algae, organic matter, and macroinvertebrates was measured. Two sites had high-energy conditions and two had low-energy conditions. It was found that surface roughness can alter ecological function, but the effects depend at least partially on site-specific factors, including exposure to wave energy and the pre-existing food web structure.Research, Planning
Engineered Approaches for Limiting Erosion along Sheltered Shorelines: A Review of Existing MethodsHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyAn overview of the engineered approaches being utilized to manage erosion along sheltered shorelines (as of 2012). Management strategies
Engineering Field Handbook Chapter 16 Streambank and Shoreline ProtectionUnited States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation ScienceNationalA guide for engineers on restoring and protecting banks and shorelines in protected waters (not open water). Tactics involve bioengineering and physical structures.Management strategies
Engineering With NatureUS Army Corps of EngineersNationalA website devoted to promoting the consideration of ecosystem benefits of nature/nature-based features in engineering designs.Management strategies
Engineering with Nature PodcastUS Army Corps of EngineersNationalThe Engineering With Nature Seminars are available online. Find the presentations, recording, and flyer with speaker bios all located on the EWN Seminar Page. Sign up for EWN mailing list also. The first seminar was in September 2020.Management strategies, Community engagement
Environmental Resource MapperNew York State Department of Environmental ConservationNew York StateThe Environmental Resource Mapper (ERM) shows the approximate location of NYS-mapped freshwater wetlands, the location and classification of streams/waterbodies, occurrences of threatened and endangered species, and more (using the “Layers and Legend” ribbon). The ERM can be used to review a project area and/or determine whether a permit application needs to be submitted to the NYSDEC.Planning
Flood Resilience Handbook for Public Access Sites along the Hudson River: from Troy to YonkersHudson River Estuary ProgramHudson River ValleyGuidance for river access site owners and managers on adapting to existing and predicted flooding due to climate change. Management strategies, Climate impacts, Community engagement
Gastropods of the Hudson River Shoreline: Subtidal, Intertidal, and Upland CommunitiesCary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Hudson River FoundationHudson River ValleyFocuses on gastropod abundance and diversity at six types of shore zones: sand, bedrock, unconsolidated rock, riprap, seawall, and timber cribbing. The study found that riprap and unconsolidated rock at intertidal elevations contained significantly higher abundance and diversity of gastropods. Sand beaches and seawall structures were less supportive. The survey found three aquatic species which were new records for the Hudson.Research, Planning
Georgia Living Shorelines (GADNR)Georgia Department of Natural ResourcesAtlanticGeorgia DNR’s homepage on living shorelines throughout the state. Links to summary report as well as an interactive in-browser map.Management strategies
Hudson Dynamic ShorelinesNew York Sea GrantHudson River ValleyAn educational and interactive GIS tool that covers flood and shoreline resilience in the Hudson River.Community engagement
Hudson River Estuary Flow ModelNew York State GIS ClearinghouseHudson River ValleyA compilation of simulated riverside water circulation statistics from a high-resolution numerical model of circulation in the tidal Hudson, using data from 2010. Parameters include water levels, currents, vertical current stresses and mixing, and surface wind waves. This can be used to understand the energy regimes impacting shorelines and help identify suitable shoreline stabilization alternatives.Research, Planning
Hudson River Flood Impact Decision Support SystemCenter for International Earth Science Information Network, Stevens Institute of Technology, New York State Energy Research and Development AuthorityHudson River ValleyAn interactive map application that supports evaluation of the scale of potential flooding for tidally-affected shorelines, under a variety of sea level rise and storm scenarios, of the Hudson River Valley and the Long Island Sound coast of Westchester County.Research, Planning
Hudson River Ice Data 2006-2012 (search for Hudson River Ice Climatology)New York State GIS ClearinghouseHudson River ValleyA compilation of observed ice data statistics from United States Coast Guard daily ice reports along the tidal Hudson River during ice season (December to March).Research, Planning
Hudson River Physical Forces Analysis: Data and MethodologyHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyAn analysis of the physical forces that impact the Hudson’s shorelines. It provides critical information on the parameters required for the proper design of ecologically enhanced shoreline stabilization projects, including wind and waves, vessel wakes, currents, and ice.Research, Planning
Hudson River Shoreline Restoration Alternatives AnalysisNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Hudson River Estuary Program, NEIWPCC, Alden Research Laboratory Inc., ASA Analysis & Communications Inc. Hudson River ValleyA report on soft engineering techniques for enhancing shoreline habitats. The document includes a literature review on shoreline stabilization methods; discusses results of a field survey of potential shoreline restoration sites in the Hudson River Estuary; evaluates preliminary designs for five example restoration sites; and describes the regulatory process for conducting the restoration projects. Research, Management strategies, Planning
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Athens Fourth Street Kayak & Canoe LaunchHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Village of AthensHudson River ValleyAn eroding and littered shoreline was cleaned up and repurposed to provide greater recreational access to the riverfront. Major accomplishments of the project included aesthetic enhancements, parking lot expansion, shoreline stabilization, and installation of a pier, accessible ramp, and floating launch.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Coxsackie Boat LaunchHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Village of CoxsackieHudson River ValleyThe objectives of the project are: 1) Improve eroding shoreline consisting predominately of historical dredge fill in order to protect the nearby parking lot; and 2) Demonstrate the functionality of restored natural shoreline features at providing erosion protection and improved habitat, as well as human access.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Dockside Park (Design Only)Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Village of Cold SpringHudson River ValleyThe shoreline of a riverside park with picturesque views of the Hudson Highlands will be engineered and enhanced to provide ecological, recreational, and floodplain functions. It will contain design elements that allow for continued functionality as sea level rises, while accommodating increased frequency and intensity of wave action and inundation.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Esopus Meadows Preserve & Water Trail SiteHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Scenic Hudson Hudson River ValleyAn existing degraded building, shoreline armoring, and impervious surfaces were removed and replaced with an erosion resistant shoreline that has natural features which have improved habitat and recreational access.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Ferry Landing at Nutton Hook (design only)Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Hudson River National Estuarine Research ReserveHudson River ValleyShoreline protection, ecological enhancement, and access improvements are planned for 500 feet of shoreline at a popular property of the NYSDEC in the town of Stuyvesant, NY. The project will involve stabilizing eroded banks, planting native vegetation and providing a fishing platform for park users of all physical abilities to fish and view the river.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Habirshaw Park Tidal Marsh ShorelineHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Beczak Environmental Education CenterHudson River ValleyAn eroding shoreline impacted by human use, currents, waves, and ice was reconstructed to include vegetation, varied slopes and sinuous soft shoreline features. This engineered shoreline protects and enhances shoreline habitat and accommodates a boat launch and other recreational activities.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Harlem River ParkHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, New York City Department of Parks and RecreationHudson River ValleySide by side with traditional steel sheeting, concrete walls and riprap, this narrow 20- acre park sandwiched between Harlem River Parkway and the Harlem River features porous alternatives to standard hard waterfront infrastructure. Porous seawalls are composed of stacked greenwalls and flexible gabions, and tide pools and native vegetation are integrated within the parks infrastructure. In addition to providing a more functional, absorbent floodplain, the project also improves public access, nearshore and upland habitat and provides a vehicle for community-based arts and cultural expression.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Haverstraw Bay ParkHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Rockland County ParksHudson River ValleyA park shoreline, originally built in 2003 was improved with a less-is-more maintenance plan and redesign after being damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 to include a wide buffer zone of native vegetation between the mowed park lawn and cobble beach at the water’s edge. This redesign protects and enhances shoreline habitat, accommodates public access to the water, provides riverfront views, and allows for other recreational activities.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Hunts Point LandingHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, New York City Economic Development CorporationHudson River ValleyAn ecological restoration project that removed degraded industrial features and implemented salt water habitat restoration, improved runoff design and increased recreational access to the water for local users.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Case Study: Nyack Beach State Park (design only)Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Palisades Interstate Park Commission, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic PreservationHudson River ValleyAfter suffering damages from Hurricane Sandy, NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation partnered with NYS Department of Environmental Conservation to redesign upland park features and re-think the shoreline at Nyack Beach State Park.HRSSP Demonstration, Management strategies, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Forensic Analysis: Common Project Performance FactorsHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyThe Forensic Analysis identifies and explains critical factors that determine success or failure of sustainable shoreline projects in storm events. The results are based on observations of the performance of six sustainable shoreline sites along the Hudson River during three major storms events from 2011-2012. HRSSP Demonstration, Climate impacts, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Forensic Analysis: Coxsackie Boat LaunchHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Village of Coxsackie, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyThe Coxsackie Boat Launch is one of six locations included in a study called What Made Shorelines Resilient: A Forensic Analysis of Shoreline Structures on the Hudson River Following Three Historic Storms. Overall, the boat launch at Coxsackie fared well during the major storm events due to the natural shore slopes created by the terraced design that were inundated during the storms, and the presence of mature vegetation.HRSSP Demonstration, Climate impacts, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Forensic Analysis: Esopus Meadows PreserveHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Scenic Hudson, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyThe Esopus Meadows Preserve is one of six locations included in a study called What Made Shorelines Resilient: A Forensic Analysis of Shoreline Structures on the Hudson River Following Three Historic Storms. Overall, the Esopus Meadows Preserve site fared well during the major storm events due to the strong root systems developed by the hardy vegetation in the years prior to the storms.HRSSP Demonstration, Climate impacts, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Forensic Analysis: Habirshaw ParkHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Beczak Environmental Education Center, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyHabirshaw Park is one of six locations included in a study called What Made Shorelines Resilient: A Forensic Analysis of Shoreline Structures on the Hudson River Following Three Historic Storms. Overall, the study revealed that the Habirshaw Park site fared well during the three major storms due to effective monitoring, maintenance, and adaptive management.HRSSP Demonstration, Climate impacts, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Forensic Analysis: Hunts Point LandingHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, New York City Economic Development Corporation, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyHunts Point Landing is one of six locations included in a study called What Made Shorelines Resilient: A Forensic Analysis of Shoreline Structures on the Hudson River Following Three Historic Storms. The Hunts Landing Point project was only in place for one of the three historic storms and experienced a moderate amount of damage. Much of the immature vegetation and some of the upland ornamental features were damaged during the storm, but most of the structural features made it through with little to no damage.HRSSP Demonstration, Climate impacts, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Forensic Analysis: Matthiessen Park & Scenic Hudson Park, Irvington, NYHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Scenic Hudson, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyMatthiessen and Scenic Hudson Park in Irvington, NY, together make up one of six locations included in a study called What Made Shorelines Resilient: A Forensic Analysis of Shoreline Structures on the Hudson River Following Three Historic Storms. Overall, both of the Irvington park locations fared well during the three extreme weather events, each site being completely submerged but only sustaining minimal damage.HRSSP Demonstration, Climate impacts, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Forensic Analysis: Methodology ReportHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyThis companion to the Forensic Analysis describes the methodology used to study the performance of six sustainable shorelines along the Hudson River during three major storm events from 2011-2012. HRSSP Demonstration, Climate impacts, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Forensic Analysis: Oak PointHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyOak Point is one of six locations included in a study called What Made Shorelines Resilient: A Forensic Analysis of Shoreline Structures on the Hudson River Following Three Historic Storms. During Sandy, the newly constructed marsh at Oak Point was severely damaged as heavy debris scoured the steep slopes at the project site.HRSSP Demonstration, Climate impacts, Monitoring
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project Report: Decision Making Regarding Shoreline Design and Management.Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Thrive ConsultingHudson River ValleyIn 2010 and 2011, 26 interviews were conducted with engineers, landscape architects, planners, consultants, developers, railroad representatives, and others involved in managing the Hudson River shoreline and designing shoreline stabilization, restoration, and development. The goals were to document how these stakeholders viewed and incorporated climate change and sea level rise into their shoreline planning and design work, to identify barriers to adopting soft shoreline engineering alternatives, and to identify training needs and information sharing mechanisms. This report documents the methods, findings, lessons learned, and recommendations from this study.Community engagement, Climate impacts
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project: Legal Framework AnalysisHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Pace University School of LawHudson River ValleySummarizes relevant plans, laws, and policies at the federal, state, and local levels. It covers topics including water quality control, wetland protection, stormwater management, disaster mitigation, floodplain management, environmental review, local land use controls, and other laws and programs. For each area, the report describes policy purpose and implementation, identifies limitations and concerns, and suggests opportunities to promote informed shoreline management and protect habitats.Planning
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Webinar Series (create link to events archive)Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines ProjectNationalThe Sustainable Shoreline Webinar Series showcases innovative, nature-based shoreline protection projects and waterfront planning solutions that advance resilience planning. Management strategies, Community engagement
Hudson River Tidal WetlandsNew York State GIS ClearinghouseHudson River ValleyShows maps of the Hudson’s vegetated habitats. It contains polygons showing the tidal wetland distribution from Hastings-on-Hudson to Troy. Data were interpreted from an aerial photo inventory acquired in 2007Research, Planning
Hudson River Wake StudyHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyAn analysis of the wake climate within the river; it was developed to help understand the erosion potential of wakes.Research, Planning
Hudson Valley Natural Resource MapperNew York State Department of Environmental ConservationHudson River ValleyA user-friendly, interactive, online mapping tool that gathers more than 30 geographic data sets for the Hudson River estuary watershed. Research, Planning
Joint Application FormNew York State Department of Environmental ConservationNew York StateThis resource contains information on submitting a joint application to the NYSDEC, the New York State Office of General Services, the New York State Department of State, and the US Army Corps of Engineers.Planning
Large Seasonal Modulation of Tides due to Ice Cover Friction in a Midlatitude EstuaryStevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyA study of the relationship between ice on the Hudson and seasonal tidal amplitude cycles. It also addresses the implications of tidal ranges, currents, vertical mixing, and salt front intrusion. Research, Planning
Living Shorelines AcademyRestore America's Estuaries, North Carolina Coastal Federation, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Southern Environmental Law CenterNationalPractical shorelines application and training modules for property owners, resource managers, restoration practitioners, and professionals.Management strategies, Community engagement
Living Shorelines EngagementNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationNationalThis two-pager describes how NOAA works to promote living shoreline research and implementation, as well as noting future actions the agency plans to take.Community engagement
Living Shorelines in the BronxWaterfront AllianceNew York CityThis article discusses three sites in the Bronx that are considered prime areas to be redeveloped as living shorelines.Management strategies
Living Shorelines Workgroup Guidance for Considering the Use of Living ShorelinesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationNationalAn overview of living shorelines that includes definitions and benefits of natural stabilization techniques, as well as how NOAA promotes their use around the country.Management strategies, Community engagement
Living Shorelines: a Nature-Based Approach to Managing Shoreline ErosionNew York State Geographic Information GatewayAtlanticAn interactive website explaining the merits of living shorelines in the New York region.Management strategies, Community engagement
Living Shorelines: A Review of Literature Relevant to New England CoastsUniversity of ConnecticutAtlanticA review of the literature on living shorelines in order to ascertain which insights from locations where living shorelines have been successful are applicable to the New England shorelines for mitigating shoreline erosion while maintaining coastal ecosystem services.Research
Living Shorelines: Better Than BulkheadsCoastal ReviewAtlanticA three-part report detailing the economic, environmental, ecological, and physical advantages that restoring and maintaining living shorelines have over building man-made structures from inorganic materials.Research, Planning
Living Shorelines: From Barriers to OpportunitiesRestore America's EstuariesNationalThis report covers different types of shoreline management and a variety of related topics and also provides recommended strategies for moving forward.Management strategies, Planning
Living Shorelines: Impacts of Erosion Control Strategies on Coastal HabitatsAtlantic States Marine Fisheries CommissionAtlanticOverview on the mechanics of shoreline sediment movement and erosion-control tactics’ relationship with coastal processes and habitats along the Atlantic coast.Management strategies, Research
Low Cost Options for Shore ProtectionUS Army Corps of EngineersNationalA handbook aimed at engineers and contractors (those familiar with engineering concepts, though not necessarily coastal/shoreline protection specifically) that examines shoreline protection tactics within the context of cost.Management strategies, Planning
Managing Shore Zones for Ecological BenefitsHudson River Sustainable Shorelines ProjectHudson River ValleyThis two-pager details sustainable shoreline best management practices. Management Strategies
Measuring Success: Monitoring Natural and Nature-Based Shoreline Features in New York StateScience and Resilience Institute of Jamaica Bay, New York State Department of State, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, New York State Energy Research and Development AuthorityNew York StateA holistic monitoring framework intended for use across New York State.Monitoring
Mitigating Shore Erosion on Sheltered CoastsThe National Academy of SciencesNationalDiscusses the legal demarcation between private and public lands, the “shoreline,” which is usually taken to be the intersection of the mean high water line with the beach profilePlanning
Native Planting Resources (create link to page when completed)Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines ProjectAtlanticNative planting guides and resources, a list of native plant nurseries serving the Northeast US, and a list of sources for purchasing landscaping materials for sustainable shorelines projects.Management strategies, Planning
Natural and Structural Measures for Shoreline StabilizationSystems Approach to Geomorphic EngineeringNationalThis informational brochure provides information about a range of shoreline management techniques, from green to gray.Management strategies, Community engagement
New Jersey Living Shorelines (NJ DEP)State of New Jersey Department of Environmental ProtectionAtlanticHomepage for NJDEP’s Living Shorelines programs. Planning and design resources, outreach programs, local councils, regulations, and case studies can be found here.Management strategies
New York Harbor Observing and Prediction System (NYHOPS)Stevens Institute of TechnologyNew York StateProvides meteorological and oceanographic conditions in real-time and forecasted up to 72 hours in the Hudson River, the East River, NY/NJ Estuary, Raritan Bay, Long Island Sound, and the coastal waters of New Jersey. Graphic images are available of water level; surface and bottom temperature; surface and bottom salinity; surface and bottom currents; NOAA winds; coastal wave height, period, and direction; and CDOM (Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter).Research, Planning
New York OPD Geographic Information GatewayNew York State Geographic Information GatewayNew York StateAn interactive mapping tool that provides public access to data, real-time information such as tides and water quality, and interactive tools for use in planning and visualization.Research, Planning
North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study: Resilient Adaptation to Increasing RiskUS Army Corps of EngineersAtlanticA study that examines coastal risks in the face of a changing climate (in response to major hurricanes that hit the gulf and Atlantic coast), establishing baselines, projected changes, and possible solutions.
Climate impacts, Research
NYSDEC Permit AdministratorsNew York State Department of Environmental ConservationNew York StateNew York State permit offices contact info Planning
NYSDEC Permit Applications (DART) searchNew York State Department of Environmental ConservationNew York StateThis resource can be used to check the status of permit applications that have been submitted.Planning
Outreach and Informal Conversations with Regulators & Permit Staff: a Summary for the Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines ProjectHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Consensus Building InstituteHudson River ValleyInterviews were conducted with permitting or regulatory staff from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), New York State Department of State (NYSDOS), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in March and April 2015. This report details the information gleaned from these conversations.Community engagement
Permits, Licenses, and RegistrationsNew York State Department of Environmental ConservationNew York StateThis webpage from the NYSDEC website shows common permits, licenses, registrations and certifications needed for projects and activities. Planning
Protecting the Pathways: A Climate Change Adaptation Framework for Hudson River Estuary Tidal WetlandsScenic HudsonHudson River ValleyA climate change adaptation framework for Hudson River Estuary tidal wetlands.Climate impacts, Management strategies
Re-Engineering Living Shorelines for High-Energy Coastal EnvironmentsNational Estuarine Research Reserve System Science CollaborativeAtlanticA project from the Guana Tolomato Mantanzas NERR in Florida, testing the efficacy of a new strategy for protecting coastal habitat in high-energy environments, by deploying “gabion-breaks,” a hybrid method for building living shorelines to protect and restore coastlines.Management strategies
Research Plan to Advance the Understanding of Potential Coastal Green Infrastructure Strategies in New York CityNEIWPCCAtlanticThis webinar focuses on a research plan investigating the use of coastal green infrastructure for protection of New York City from flooding and erosion.Climate impacts, Research, Management strategies
Resiliency and Economic Development GuidanceNew York State Department of Environmental ConservationNew York StateProvides information on shoreline natural processes, structure design, and the permitting process to help engineers, surveyors, contractors, and landowners select the shoreline management alternative that minimizes project impacts while achieving the necessary protection.Planning
Resources for Planning, Designing, Constructing, and Maintaining a Nature-Based ShorelineHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, New York State Department of ENvironmental ConservationHudson River ValleyAn overview of nature-based shoreline protection methods. Management strategies
Revitalizing Hudson RiverfrontsScenic HudsonHudson River ValleyThis report from Scenic Hudson is intended to help guide communities in developing and implementing a future vision for waterfront development.Management strategies, Climate impacts
SAV (Hudson River Estuary Documented Submerged Aquatic Vegetation)New York State GIS ClearinghouseHudson River ValleyShows the extent of SAV (water celery and water chestnut) in the estuary, with separate coverage for 1997, 2002, and 2007.Research, Planning
Shore Erosion Control: The Natural ApproachNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Natural Resources Conservation Service of the United States Department of AgricultureAtlanticAn outreach booklet describing the benefits and use of nature-based shoreline protection methods, especially in the Chesapeake Bay area.Management strategies, Community engagement
Shoreline Management ManualTown of East Hampton, ConnecticutAtlanticA guidance outlining sustainable shoreline management aims to provide a set of standards and knowledge for homeowners that have access/management of shorelines on FirstLight properties along the shores of Candlewood Lake, Lake Lillinonah, or Lake Zoar.Management strategies
Shoreline Stabilization Handbook for Lake Champlain and Other Inland LakesNorthwest Regional Planning CommissionAtlanticThis handbook for Lake Champlain area residents and government officials includes information about shorelines stabilization options, including hard structural methods and bio-engineered methods.Management strategies
Shoreline Types PolylineNew York State GIS ClearinghouseHudson River ValleyShows shoreline types for the tidal Hudson River, from the Tappan Zee Bridge to Troy.Research, Planning
Shoreline Use and Perception Survey Report.Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Thrive ConsultingHudson River ValleyA survey was conducted with anglers and kayakers in order to learn about these user groups’ perceptions, values, and preferences related to shorelines. The results showed a variety of aesthetic preferences among shoreline users. Respondents generally had a strong sense of the ecological importance of different shorelines, but they did not necessarily connect that with their own land management practices: they liked tidy shorelines.Community engagement
Significant Coastal Fish and Wildlife BoundariesNew York State GIS ClearinghouseHudson River ValleyAs identified by the NYS Department of State, Division of Coastal Resources for the State’s Coastal Management Program.Research, Planning
Softening Our Shorelines: Policy and Practice for Living Shorelines Along the Gulf and Atlantic Coasts(National Wildlife Federation 2020)National Wildlife Federation, Coastal States OrganizationAtlanticA review of the use of living shorelines across Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Policies and permitting requirements were analyzed to look for both incentives and barriers to encouraging the use of ecologically friendly shoreline protection techniques. Recommendations and best practices are made on how to promote the use of living shorelines.Research, Management strategies, Planning, Community engagement
Systems Approach to Geomorphic EngineeringSystems Approach to Geomorphic EngineeringNationalA partnership of federal, state, and local agencies, non- governmental organizations, academic institutions, engineers, and private businesses working together to use and promote green-gray approaches to ensure coastal community and shoreline resilience, broaden science, engineering, policy and marketing activity both domestically and internationally, and engage community partners in regional demonstrations.Management strategies
Ten questions to ask when building defenses to protect Hudson River ShorelinesHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Cary Institute of Ecosystem StudiesHudson River ValleyThis handbook provides an overview of the necessary considerations that should precede the design of a sustainable shoreline.Planning
Terminology for the Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project.Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines ProjectHudson River ValleyThis document contains definitions frequently used by partners involved with the Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, creating a common understanding and reference for a multitude of partners.Community engagement
The Ecology of Freshwater Shore ZonesCary Institute of Ecosystem StudiesHudson River ValleyProvides a comprehensive summary of what is known about the ecological functioning of the shore zone in freshwater ecosystems.Research, Planning
The Ecology of Freshwater Wrack Along Natural and Engineered Hudson River ShorelinesCary Institute of Ecosystem StudiesHudson River ValleyExplores the ecology of wrack on different types of Hudson River shorelines. The study found that engineered shorelines tended to accumulate little wrack, have high wrack loss rates, and exhibit low diversity of invertebrate communities. These indicate a loss of ecological function.Research, Planning
The Ecology of Wrack: Decomposition and Use By Invertebrates On Natural and Engineered Shorelines of the Hudson RiverCary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, State University of New York Albany, Hudson River FoundationHudson River ValleyExplores decomposition rates and invertebrate communities of wrack on four different types of Hudson River shorelines. Faster decomposition rates and lower invertebrate density were found on cribbing, compared to the other shoreline types. Riprap showed similar decomposition rates and invertebrate density to the rocky shoreline. The findings show that neither cribbing nor riprap can replace the ecological function of natural sandy shorelines.Research, Planning
Tidal Datums and Their ApplicationUnited States Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationThis document provides background information on tidal datum planes. Tidal datums are chiefly used to determine horizontal boundaries, and for estimating heights or depths. The legal determinations of private and public lands, state owned tidelands, state submerged lands, U.S. Navigable waters, U.S. Territorial Sea, Contiguous Zone, and Exclusive Economic Zone, and the High Seas, or international waters, depend on the determination of tidal datums and their surveyed intersection with the coast.Planning
Tidal Hudson River Ice Cover ClimatologyHudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project, Stevens Institute of TechnologyHudson River ValleyA compilation of observed ice data probabilistic statistics, including ice thickness, distribution, percent cover, and type. It is based on United States Coast Guard daily ice reports along the tidal Hudson from December to March, 2004–2015.Research, Planning
Tidal Wetlands Guidance Document: Living Shoreline Techniques in the Marine District of New York State (NYSDEC, 2017)New York State Department of Environmental ConservationAtlanticA guidance aimed at the NYSDEC staff, as well as professionals and property-owners, to promote understanding and use of nature-based shoreline protection tactics for habitat enhancement and storm risk reduction. Provides information on types of living shorelines, reviews how tidal wetland and protection of waters permit standards relate to living shorelines, and speaks to proper siting, maintenance, and monitoring considerations.Management strategies, Community engagement
Topography LiDARNew York State Department of Environmental ConservationHudson River ValleyGeotiff images of contours collected in 2012.Research, Planning
Urban Waterfront Adaptive StrategiesCity of New York Department of City PlanningNew York CityA look at resiliency measures, including nature/nature-based shoreline protection tactics, that take into account the unique human needs of New York City, specifically, though some findings may be applied to other highly-developed, urban environments.Management strategies
Use of Natural and Nature-Based Features for Coastal ResilienceUS Army Corps of EngineersNationalThis report provides information about natural and nature-based features (such as dunes, oyster reefs, and marshes) that can contribute to coastal resilience and risk reduction.Management strategies
Using Natural Measures to Reduce the Risk of Flooding and Erosion: Guidance from New York State’s Department of Environmental Conservation and Department of StateNew York State Department of Environmental Conservation, New York State Department of StateHudson River ValleyInformation for decision-makers on natural resilience measures and how they can help to reduce risk from sea-level rise, storm surge, flooding, erosion and extreme weather events.Management strategies, Climate impacts, Community engagement
Vegetation of Riprapped Revetments along the Freshwater Tidal Hudson River, New YorkCary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Hudsonia LTDHudson River ValleyAn analysis of the abundance and composition of vegetation in riprap revetments on Hudson River shorelines. It showed that revetments commonly host a mix of ~50% native and 50% non-native plants. Shorelines varied from nearly barren to flush with plants. The potential to increase habitat value with ecologically-informed design and management is discussed.Research, Planning
Waterfront Edge Design GuidelinesWaterfront AllianceAtlanticAn incentive-based rating system that examines and analyzes waterfronts on the basis of creating shoreline developments that are “resilient, environmentally healthy, accessible, and equitable for all”. Currently based in New York City, looking to expand its programming.Management strategies, Community engagement
Coastal Resilience Mapping PortalThe Nature ConservancyNationalThe Coastal Resilience tools provide support for decision-makers working at national and multi-national scales in assessing where to act in risk reduction, adaptation and conservation. They build from critical resources such as the Global Platform on Risk Reduction, World Risk Report, and Conservation Atlas.Management strategies, Planning, Climate impacts
Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines Project Research Assessment ProtocolHudson River Sustainable Shorelines ProjectHudson River ValleyThe Research Assessment Protocol (previously known as the Rapid Assessment Protocol) provides a research-grade approach to evaluating the ecological and physical performance of sustainable shorelines over time. It involves monitoring established assessment points. We recommend this protocol be implemented on a five-year schedule.HRSSP Demonstration, Monitoring