Hudson River Almanac
The Hudson River Almanac is a weekly natural history newsletter that covers the Hudson from the High Peaks of the Adirondacks to New York Harbor. It seeks to capture the river’s spirit, magic, and science by presenting observations from many individuals who delight in the diversity of nature in the Hudson Valley.

Since 1994, observations have been compiled from the contributions of more than 2000 volunteers, ranging from elementary school students to professional biologists. In presenting these records, the Almanac provides valuable river information to the public, places contemporary observations in historical perspective, and encourages others to look more closely at the Hudson and share what they see. In addition to recording what nature is doing over the year, the entries offer a fascinating measure of human emotional responses to natural phenomena.

Over time, the Almanac may serve as a comprehensive program to document changes in the ecosystem. Often, information about obscure animals and subtle changes can come only through direct observations made in many places over long periods of time. By compiling records from volunteers who observe nature as scientists or simply for their own pleasure, the Almanac builds a data base that can be used to guide future studies of Hudson Valley ecology.

Contribute Your Observations

Share your observations with other Hudson River lovers by e-mailing them to compiler Tom Lake

March 20 to March 29, 2024

March 20 to March 29, 2024

The first of our native spring flowers were blooming. Despite the availability of technology to measure springtime, many of us instinctively look to the sky, the forests, and the fields for confirmation, something we have been observing in the watershed for 13,000 years.

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March 16 to March 22, 2024

March 16 to March 22, 2024

This week’s Almanac took us through the Vernal Equinox, and to the beginning of Year 31 for the Hudson River Almanac. We were also treated this week to a sighting of a very rare western songbird.

After this week’s edition, there will be a one-week pause in the Hudson River Almanac. We will return with a two-week Almanac on April 12.

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March 6 to March 15, 2024

March 6 to March 15, 2024

A regular entry for the Vernal Equinox (3/19) will appear in next week’s Almanac. However, the moment of the Equinox, the beginning of Year 31 for the Almanac, occurred in the present week. Recognizing this, we felt it was in the best interest of the Hudson River Almanac and our readers to include its origin story this week.

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March 1 to March 8, 2024

March 1 to March 8, 2024

The bald eagle, our nation’s symbol, was removed from the Federal Endangered Species list in 2007. This followed a long period of recovery from habitat loss, the effects of DDT, and a myriad of other factors attributable to human behavior. Their recovery in the Hudson Valley in the last 25 years has been nothing short of miraculous, one of the most successful New York State wildlife recoveries ever. This week we continued to demonstrate how miraculous events can occur, when we take the time, display the empathy, and make the effort on the behalf of wildlife.

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February 23 to March 1, 2024

February 23 to March 1, 2024

This was a week when the first of our amphibians risked their life and limb to get to the “other side.” This week’s full moon brought us a little more than usual, as well. And, with many bald eagle nests incubating, we begin to do the math on when hatches may occur.

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February 17 to February 23, 2024

February 17 to February 23, 2024

Since the start of the new millennia, winter has been dominated by bald eagles, particularly along tidewater. Many, if not most, of the Hudson Valley bald eagle nests are presently incubating and the countdown to hatch (32-35 days) is underway. Glass eels in from the sea have had a sputtering beginning but are due to pick up as the water warms. Add in oysters and a lost croaker, and we had a good week.

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February 10 to February 16, 2024

February 10 to February 16, 2024

The Hudson River has always seemed mysterious. The estuary is an overwhelmingly opaque expanse of grayness. What’s beneath, swimming unseen, is largely left to our imagination. This week two uncommon fishes were captured in sampling gear, each seemingly out-of-place. It is easy to day-dream as you look out on the water and wonder, “what else is hiding out there?” Our list of 237 documented species of fish for the Hudson River seems so transitory.

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February 3 to February 9, 2024

February 3 to February 9, 2024

There were subtle signs of spring in early February including glass eels in from the sea, bald eagles in full breeding preparation, the matting call of an American woodcock, and at least one day of record warmth.

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January 26 to February 2, 2024

January 26 to February 2, 2024

This week was highlighted by the arrival, after a long ocean journey, of the first glass eels of the season. Our bald eagle nests were stirring in anticipation of the soon-to-arrive mating and egg-laying season.

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January 20 to January 26, 2024

January 20 to January 26, 2024

The lead story this week was the appearance of an uncommon to rare gull that flaunted its rarity with multiple sightings across several locations, not a common occurrence for one-off rare birds. We also have a bit more Carolina wren commentary following rather comprehensive coverage last week. Then we had a sign of real winter on the river, eagles on ice floes, albeit just a couple of eagles on one tiny ice floe.

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January 13 to January 19, 2024

January 13 to January 19, 2024

Winter bird counts continued this week. They ultimately give us an idea of the species richness and diversity, as well as an appreciation of the wildlife that we share on the water, in the fields and in the forests.

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January 6 to January 12, 2024

January 6 to January 12, 2024

Project of the Hudson River Estuary Program Compiled and edited by Tom Lake, Consulting Naturalist We moved into a very un-winter season with almost no ice on the estuary and snowmelt flooding in the High Peaks. Late season warblers, many of which might be expected to...

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